How to overcome “Photographer’s Block”

It happens to all of us – the dreaded Photographer’s Block. If you are into art, it is something that occurs rather regularly and is frustrating and depressing. How does one conquer it? Although there is definitely no hard and fast formula, the following tips can hopefully help.

  1. TAKE A SHORT BREAK:

First of all, fight it. Some people try to get past this artist’s block by taking a break from their artistic activity. This may work but if no improvement is noticeable within a couple of weeks, then I suggest that one moves on to the next stage and do something about it.

  1. GO OUT!

Just grab your camera and go out. Go by yourself and I suggest going in the early morning or the late afternoon. The failing light is often the best time to capture images. From my experience, anytime I take my camera and go for my own “Photowalk”, I always manage to come back with a couple of decent images… and, furthermore, it makes me reflect and focus.

  1. RE-CREATE & RESEARCH:

Researching other photos and iconic photographers for inspiration. This can be done through internet, magazines, TV, blogs, websites etc.  Seeing how a particular image was constructed or how a photograph has intrigued you will make you notice when and how a successful image works. This could inspire you to re-create an image and try to imbue it with your own interpretation. I find Pinterest particularly useful for this approach.

  1. VISIT ART GALLERIES:

Go and search for inspiration at art galleries, exhibitions and events.  It does not even have to be photography – absorb someone else’s creativity and your imagination and inspiration will usually benefit.

  1. ENROL WITH A PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB:

Networking with other people like you, will often time result in creativity feeding off of creativity. You will be surprised at what you can learn from someone just starting out, as well as from experienced persons. One can learn from everyone and isolating yourself leads to remove you from connecting with the work of other people and, most probably, your work will become stale.

  1. ATTEMPT A PROJECT:

Challenge yourself by focusing on a project. It can be very simple, for example, clouds or shadows.  It may also involve finding a prop and using it through a series of images. Nothing stimulates and improves your work than concentrating on a subject.

  1. TAKE A CLASS:

Enrol for a photography class. It is important that you keep up to date with new technology, new ideas and learning new skills. Particularly in this age, a photographer needs to be a master of a wide number of skills and techniques in order to compete.

  1. THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX:

Think of things that don’t usually go together. Let us say a fridge and a male model. Try and think of ways to juxtapose the objects. It is a brain exercise which stimulates thinking differently and exploring new avenues. It becomes an exercise in exploring subjects from all the possible points of view.

Kevin Casha