The Fine Art photography of Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

I recently had the opportunity to meet talented South African photographer Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge at Le Meridien Hotel in St. Julian’s, where she is holding her photographic exhibition. “Lacey & Lace” is a collection of works, exquisitely printed and framed in large format having a subject that revolves around the delicate structure and texture of lace and feminine beauty. In this exhibition, Nadette has actually tackled two separate genres of photography and managed to cleverly link and combine them together. Nadette is essentially a highly skilled fashion photographer with an impressive portfolio of works behind her. The work in Lacey & Lace is paired in ‘sets’ of two: a beauty female very fashionable portrait and a studied still life that complements the same portrait. Nadette’s photography background is in conventional film and the discipline that years of film photography has instilled in her is evident; her work is planned, studied and skilfully executed clearly demonstrating her schooling and wide experience in the photography medium.

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

Following is Nadette’s concept:

Lacey & Lace the idea behind it
The concept for this exhibition was born from my love of lace and my passion for beauty and stills photography. I wanted to do something that merged the two and so the idea came about to work on 18 pieces accentuating lace as the common theme throughout the images, incorporating a DPS (double-page spread) approach. From my years of shooting for magazines, I found that I instinctively visualized my imagery in a double page layout – so I wanted to echo that idea in my exhibition by creating images in a 2-part story.
I photographed 9 beauty portraits each exploring a different theme and flavour, and then expanded the concepts further by shooting a complementary still for each model. The images will be viewed in pairs, but can still exist as pieces in their own right.
From the onset, my aim was to create images that were extremely textured and layered. As lace is the common thread, I explored the concept by integrating lace in the styling aspects of the subject matter, and then layering the images digitally afterwards by incorporating scanned-in pieces of lace. It is my hope that the photographed lace and scanned lace are not obviously differentiated from one other, but viewed blended to create the layered effect.
The final pieces are printed on canvas at 80 x 120cm each, to fully appreciate the layered textures.
Each beauty portrait is titled by incorporating the girls name Lacey, and each complementary still using the word Lace.

Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge Email: nadettephoto@melita.com Mobile: 9935 6592

© blog – KEVIN CASHA

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

© Nadette Clare-Talbot Bettridge

THE PERILS OF INTERNET

The Perils of internet….

The recent bad experience of one of my students made me reflect on problems when buying from the internet. Naturally, there are bargains to be had and many reputable buyers and, furthermore, at times we are forced to buy from internet as some products are not readily available from local distributors. Yet, I think we need to be aware of a few pointers which I would like to mention here when making online purchases:

• You are not seeing the product you are buying at point of purchase. This introduces the risk of being sold a damaged, shop-soiled or even counterfeit item, and the risk of damage during transit due to insufficient packing, rough handling or similar. Beware of deals that seem too good to be true – sometimes that cheap battery, lens or camera case will prove very expensive in the end.

• Products sold on EU websites are not necessarily tax-paid in the EU. This exposes you to the risk of having to pay an extra 5.1% duty and 18% VAT on the item you purchase upon clearance through Malta customs.

• Most manufacturers have different warranty schemes for world regions. A product marketed by a manufacturer for sale in the Far East or US is not normally covered by their EU-wide warranty. Internet sites are not obliged to specify where they buy their products from and don’t often specify whether the product they are selling is covered by the manufacturer’s EU warrenty scheme or not.

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• Furthermore, claiming a repair or replacement under warranty requires a document, showing signature and stamp of the seller together with the serial number of the equipment being claimed and the date of sale. You don’t normally get this document when purchasing camera equipment on the internet unless you specifically ask for it. Local distributors in Malta will require this document to get reimbursed by the manufacturer for any warranty claim they honour, so it is understandable for them to insist on an original, signed document of sale as part of your warranty claim.

• Counterfeit goods. This is a growing problem globally. The selling of high cost counterfeit goods on the internet can be a costly exercise. Never buy cut price big name brands unless you are confident of the outlets authenticity. Rogue websites. As well as counterfeit goods there are criminal gangs out there who produce web sites which look like reputable retailers which are in fact designed to steal your payment details and or identity. They look just like the real thing and are often sites you have used before. Always make sure you type in the address yourself and never follow links from emails or even other web sites.

Naturally, I have researched the above information and I hope that this will enable you to better evaluate circumstances when you contemplate your next purchase. Good luck!

THE VANISHING MALTA PROJECT

An APS Bank Project

Vanishing Malta

The idea behind the three year project is to raise consciousness on social issues captured through photography. The chosen theme for this year is Vanishing Malta and aims to ‘freeze’ in time several characteristics that belong to the present or past, interpret them through the eyes of five photographers and thus convey them to all future viewers.

BOOK COVER

BOOK COVER

The photographers were selected on a number of criteria including their passion for the medium, their technical background and a creative eye to portray the given subject. To encourage cultural diversity and integration, two foreign photographers were engaged, namely Tomoko Goto from Japan and Anastasia Zhukova Rizzo from Latvia, in order to garner a foreign view of how Malta is perceived. Martin Agius, a well-established photojournalist brings professionalism and experience to the group, whilst Lorraine Abela and Mark Pace, who are both young and have recently gained their Higher National Diploma in photography, round up the group with their enthusiasm and contemporary conceptual outlook.

one of the images exhibited at APS Bank in Swatar

one of the images exhibited at APS Bank in Swatar

The Vanishing Malta publication would not have been possible without the help of the writers who penned in the text, the APS Marketing Unit and Midsea Books, who were responsible for the design and printing. Finally, I would like to sincerely thank the APS Bank Management for making this idea materialize. The Bank has always believed in increasing awareness and pride about our heritage and has regularly been at the forefront of the art scene by encouraging local art and artists to pursue their talent. APS Bank’s belief in photographic art is extremely beneficial not only for local photographers but also for enabling the general public to further appreciate and cherish our inimitable heritage.
I hope that visitors to the Vanishing Malta exhibition and readers of this book are stimulated to think deeper into what makes our beloved little island what it is today.

Kevin Casha 2016
Exhibition Curator and Book Editor